Building Homes, Building Hope

This Cleanup Week – Make A Difference with Habitat ReStore

Have you started your spring cleaning? If you are a resident of the Fargo-Moorhead area, you are likely getting ready for Fargo-Moorhead’s Cleanup Week, held this year on May 5-9. Every year, residents of Dilworth, Moorhead, Fargo, and West Fargo have this week to dispose of tires, appliances, and other large items at no charge on their regular garbage collection day.

 

This Cleanup Week, there’s a great opportunity to get rid of unwanted items in an environmentally sustainable way that also supports the local community.  Consider donating your new and used building materials, and furniture to Habitat ReStore and receiving a tax deduction! Habitat ReStore even accepts donations on materials that can’t be disposed of during Cleanup week.

 

Habitat ReStore is a home improvement thrift store that has a three-fold mission: to divert usable materials from area landfills, to offer a low cost option for shoppers doing home improvement projects, and to raise money to support Habitat for Humanity.  By giving their donations another life, Habitat ReStore is able to divert almost 500 tons of materials from area landfills annually!  All proceeds from Habitat ReStore support Lake Agassiz Habitat for Humanity as they build simple, decent, and affordable homes in partnership with families in Cass and Clay counties.

 

Cleanup Week Rules

Each city has their own specifications, which can be found on the Cleanup Week website.

 

1. Separate items of the same type into distinct piles (tires, appliances, furniture, brush, household garbage, etc.). Separate trucks collect the items.

2. Place garbage in disposable containers, except for oversized items.

3. Items will be collected on your normal garbage pickup day. Do not set items out more than one day early.

4. Crews will not return to pick up garbage set out too late.

5. Remove refrigerator and freezer doors. Do not place food or any other waste inside appliances.

 6. Items must be from residences; no commercial waste will be accepted. Keep household garbage at least four feet away from other Cleanup Week items.

 

If you have home improvement materials that are in usable condition or are not accepted by the city, consider supporting your community and the environment by donating to Habitat ReStore and getting a tax deduction!

 

Drop Off: Bring your donation to Habitat ReStore, 210 11th Street North, Moorhead during store hours, which are 10-6 Mon – Fri and 10-4 Saturday.

 

Pick Up: Call (218) 359-0812 to schedule a FREE donation pick-up.

For a list of accepted donations, please visit our webpage.

 

 

These 6 Upcycled Projects Were Made Right at ReStore

Upcycled home projects have become one of the coolest ways to DIY. From re-purposed light fixtures that bring new style to a room to doors that function as tables, there are so many ways to upcycle old furniture and fixtures into new and unique pieces.

That’s exactly what a few staff members at ReStore have been doing. By putting some TLC into old, donated pieces, they’ve been able to turn them into completely new—and sellable—furnishings. All the materials used for these 6 projects came right from ReStore—and the amount each piece cost to make just might surprise you.

Upcycled Vanity 
It didn’t take much to give this old vanity a cool modern update. The vanity was sanded and painted white. Then a 2×12 piece of lumber was stained, sealed with 3 coats of polyurethane, and made into a counter top. The addition of a vessel sink and tall faucet added extra flair to this piece.
Total cost of ReStore materials (not including sink and faucet): $30

School Door Coffee Table 


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The antique wood used to create this table makes it a one-of-a-kind centerpiece for a room. The old school doors used in this project previously decorated the walls in the ReStore receiving room, and a piece of early-1900s hardwood salvaged from a deconstruction job was used for the bottom shelf. All it took to produce this unique table was some cutting, sanding, assembling and polyurethane sealing.
Total cost of ReStore materials: $35

Window Coffee Table 


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This coffee table doubles as a functional storage space. An old window from a salvage deconstruction job was used, as was the same 1900s hardwood used in the school door coffee table. 4 spindles were cut down for the legs and the outside of the table was painted white. Then hinges were attached to the inside of the table so the window top could be opened, creating a great space for storage.
Total cost of ReStore materials: $20

Console TV Shelf


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There’s no need to throw out an ancient console TV when you can make it functional! The insides of this old Zenith console TV were taken out and replaced with a middle shelf and a piece of wainscot on the back. The outside was painted Cool Breeze Blue and the inside was painted white.
Total cost of ReStore materials: $20

Door Mirror 
Here’s a creative and rustic way to display a mirror in a foyer, porch or other part of your home. This project was quick and easy—all it took was an old door and mirror. Some of the paint that was coming off the door was scraped away, and 3 coats of polyurethane were applied. Then the glass window panels were replaced with cut pieces of an old mirror.
Total cost of ReStore materials: $15

 

 

 

Upcycled Light Fixture 
Transforming an old light fixture into a more contemporary piece can completely change the look of a room—and it was a really simple project for the ReStore staff. This fixture was spray painted with metal paint. Then the globes were replaced with more modern ones from ReStore. Done!
Total cost of ReStore materials: $10

It’s amazing what you can create on a budget. Find these and more upcycled projects on the ReStore Facebook page at facebook.com/lahfhrestore. And don’t forget to stop into ReStore to check out our latest upcycled projects—or get the supplies to make your own!

Lake Agassiz Habitat for Humanity ReStore is located at 210 11th Street North in Moorhead, Minnesota. Our hours are 10:00 am – 6:00 pm Monday through Friday and 10:00 am – 4:00 pm Saturday. Visit us online at lakeagassizhabitat.org.

 

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Building Hope

It was the 60’s in Americus, Georgia when the first inklings of what is now Habitat for Humanity took shape. On a small community farm called Koinonia, a farmer and a biblical scholar practiced the art of sharing goods, seeking to put God’s love into action. The scholar, a man named Clarence Jordan, met a couple named Millard and Linda Fuller who shared a similar mission. Together they developed the idea of “partnership housing.”

The idea was that those in need of adequate housing could work alongside volunteers to create affordable homes. The houses, built at no profit, would be paid for through no-interest loans provided by supporters. Fundraising would be pooled to build even more homes. They called it “The Fund for Humanity.”

Dream became reality when the first concrete-block home was given to a couple, Beau and Emma, and their five kids. They had a modern kitchen, indoor bathroom and heating system -- much different from the unpainted, uninsulated shack with no plumbing where they had previously lived.

After taking their mission global to Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo) and then returning to the United States, the Fullers officially launched Habitat for Humanity International in 1976.

The Fullers in Zaire.

Today, over 40 years later, this global organization has helped build, renovate and repair more than 1,000,000 affordable houses. These homes are now sheltering more than 9.8 million people worldwide.

Locally, Lake Agassiz Habitat for Humanity (LAHFH) is proud to be a part of this global story that is changing lives.

LAHFH strives to eliminate substandard housing right here in the Fargo/Moorhead community by constructing and rehabilitating homes for low income families. We believe that every man, woman and child should have a simple, durable place to live in dignity and safety. We believe that decent shelter in decent communities should be a matter of conscience and action for all.

With the generous support of donors and volunteers, LAHFH has made a lasting and meaningful impact in our community by helping local families realize their dreams of home-ownership. We have served 55 families, by constructing or renovating homes in Cass and Clay Counties.

This Giving Hearts Day, we want to open even more doors for our partner families. To do this, we’ve determined that a donation of just $24 will purchase one doorknob. This is how YOU can help open the door for a local family so they can have a safe affordable place to call home.

On February 9, 2017, your donation will be multiplied by Western State Bank, First Lutheran, Olivet Lutheran and other generous donors. It the best way to show your support, and maximize your gift.

Join Lake Agassiz Habitat, and #givewhereyoulive this Giving Hearts Day, by giving HERE on February 9!